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Twitter’s stock plunges as user growth stalls

Enlarge / Traders at the New York Stock Exchange beneath a monitor displaying Twitter's stock symbol in 2016. (credit: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Several years ago, Twitter seemed like it would be the social media darling of the decade. Founders had dreams of being the first Internet company to reach one billion users, making it "the pulse of the planet."

That's not going to happen, and investors are cluing in. Twitter had 328 million average monthly active users, or MAU, in the three months ending in June, which is unchanged from the previous quarter. The company's shares were down more than 10 percent this morning on the news.

The news comes despite Twitter's role in the daily news cycle perhaps being more prominent than ever, given the platform often serves as President Donald Trump's favored medium of expression.

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Cable lobby claims US is totally overflowing in broadband competition

(credit: Free Press)

Are you ever frustrated about a lack of choice for home Internet providers? Well, worry no more. The nation's top cable lobby group is here to let you know that the US is simply overflowing in broadband competition.

In a new post titled, "America's competitive TV and Internet markets," NCTA-The Internet & Television Association says that Internet competition statistics are in great shape as long as you factor in slow DSL networks and smartphone access.

Competition isn’t just the rule in television, it defines broadband markets as well. In spite of living in one of the largest and most rural nations, 88 percent of American consumers can choose from at least two wired Internet service providers. When you include competition from mobile and satellite broadband providers, much of America is home to multiple competing ISPs leveraging different and ever-improving technologies. This competition has led to rapid progress in the quality of consumer internet connections with average peak speeds in America quadrupling over the last five years, from 23.4 Mbps to 86.5 Mbps and the average price per megabit dropping 90 percent in 10 years, from $9.01 per megabit per second to $0.89 per megabit per second.

Many Americans who feel that they have only one viable choice for home broadband might think that cable lobbyists are describing an alternate reality. But it's easy to see the difference between NCTA marketing and Internet users' actual experiences. Yes, if you factor in any wireline home Internet provider offering any speed, then US customers can generally choose between a fast cable network and a slow DSL one. But if one of your two options isn't fast enough to meet your needs, then there's really just one choice.

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YouTube Red and Google Play Music may merge into one service

(credit: Flickr: Rego Korosi )

Google is notorious for having many services that do similar things, like its array of chat apps. Google's music services have been fragmented for years, but the company may change that soon. According to a report from The Verge, YouTube's head of music Lyor Cohen stated at the New Music Seminar conference in New York last night that YouTube Red and Google Play Music should merge to make a singular, cohesive service.

Although the report doesn't mention YouTube Music (which is a another separate service), it's safe to say that all three streaming offerings could be combined into one. Google merged the YouTube Music and Google Play Music product teams together earlier this year, and that move came shortly after the business development teams for both services merged in 2016.

Google didn't confirm or deny the merger, but the company did say users would be given notice well before any big changes occur. "Music is very important to Google and we’re evaluating how to bring together our music offerings to deliver the best possible product for our users, music partners, and artists," reads the statement in the report. "Nothing will change for users today and we’ll provide plenty of notice before any changes are made."

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Lawsuit seeks Ajit Pai’s net neutrality talks with Internet providers

Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai testifying before a Senate subcommittee on May 11, 2016, when he was a commissioner. (credit: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

The Federal Communications Commission was sued today by a group that says the commission failed to comply with a public records request for communications about net neutrality between FCC officials and Internet service providers.

On April 26, a nonprofit called American Oversight filed a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request asking the FCC for all records related to communications on net neutrality between Internet service providers and Chairman Ajit Pai or Pai's staff. The group asked for "correspondence, e-mails, telephone call logs, calendar entries, meeting agendas," and any other records of such communications.

The group also asked for similar records related to FCC communications with members of Congress, congressional staff, and members of the media. But American Oversight's lawsuit against the FCC says the commission hasn't complied with the requests.

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Verizon accused of violating net neutrality rules by throttling video

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Steven Puetzer)

The Federal Communications Commission should investigate whether Verizon Wireless violated net neutrality rules by throttling video applications on its mobile network, advocacy group Free Press says.

Free Press is asking people to sign a petition that will be delivered to the FCC.

"Late last week Verizon Wireless customers started to notice something suspicious: Videos from Netflix and YouTube were slow," the call for signatures says. "Verizon Wireless couldn't explain why. When reporters asked the wireless giant to comment, the company first said it was just a temporary network test with no impact on user experience. But Verizon later admitted that, temporary test or not, it was indeed 'optimizing' video streams."

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