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iPhone X Low Light Photography Test Demonstrates Improved Telephoto Lens

The 2016 iPhone 7 Plus was the first Apple smartphone to feature a dual lens camera, and this year's iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X followed suit, improving upon last year's design with larger sensors and better signal image processing. The iPhone X also benefits from added optical image stabilization and larger aperture on the telephoto lens.

In what may come a surprise to most casual snappers, the telephoto lens in Apple's dual camera isn't always activated when the 2x zoom is selected in the native Camera app. In some low light scenes, iOS opts to crop a wide angle image instead in an effort to obtain a better image with less noise and a lower likelihood of blurring.

With this in mind, Studio Neat designer Dan Provost recently conducted an experiment to see how much the telephoto lens in the iPhone X improves upon the one in the iPhone 7 Plus. To do this, he looked at how much light is required before an iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone X switches to the telephoto lens when the 2x zoom mode is selected. This would show Provost if the frequency of cropping an image is at all reduced in Apple's latest smartphone.
I placed an object (in this case, an old Rolleiflex camera) on a white backdrop, and flanked it on both sides with two LED studio lights. I set up the iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone X on tripods (using the Glif, natch) and positioned them to keep the framing as similar as possible. Then, starting from a completely dark room, I slowly raised the light levels and observed when the lens switched on each camera. The results are in the video below.

As the embedded video demonstrates, Provost discovered that the iPhone X switched to the telephoto lens much more quickly in his artificial low light scenes, requiring approximately 2 fewer stops of light before switching to the telephoto lens, compared to the iPhone 7 Plus.

"This is obviously great news, and speaks to how improved the second lens is after just one year," says Provost. "In my own use of the phone for the past couple weeks, it does indeed seem to be the case that I am very rarely presented with a 2X cropped image."

You can learn more about Provost's iPhone X low light photography experiment over on the Studio Neat website.

Related Roundups: iPhone 7, iPhone 8, iOS 11, iPhone X

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iPhone X Low Light Photography Test Demonstrates Improved Telephoto Lens

The 2016 iPhone 7 Plus was the first Apple smartphone to feature a dual lens camera, and this year's iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X followed suit, improving upon last year's design with larger sensors and better signal image processing. The iPhone X also benefits from added optical image stabilization and larger aperture on the telephoto lens.

In what may come as a surprise to most casual snappers, the telephoto lens in Apple's dual camera isn't always activated when the 2x zoom is selected in the native Camera app. In some low light scenes, iOS opts to crop a wide angle image instead in an effort to obtain a better image with less noise and a lower likelihood of blurring.

With this in mind, Studio Neat designer Dan Provost recently conducted an experiment to see how much the telephoto lens in the iPhone X improves upon the one in the iPhone 7 Plus. To do this, he looked at how much light is required before an iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone X switches to the telephoto lens when the 2x zoom mode is selected. This would show Provost if the frequency of cropping an image is at all reduced in Apple's latest smartphone.
I placed an object (in this case, an old Rolleiflex camera) on a white backdrop, and flanked it on both sides with two LED studio lights. I set up the iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone X on tripods (using the Glif, natch) and positioned them to keep the framing as similar as possible. Then, starting from a completely dark room, I slowly raised the light levels and observed when the lens switched on each camera. The results are in the video below.

As the embedded video demonstrates, Provost discovered that the iPhone X switched to the telephoto lens much more quickly in his artificial low light scenes, requiring approximately 2 fewer stops of light before switching to the telephoto lens, compared to the iPhone 7 Plus.

"This is obviously great news, and speaks to how improved the second lens is after just one year," says Provost. "In my own use of the phone for the past couple weeks, it does indeed seem to be the case that I am very rarely presented with a 2X cropped image."

You can learn more about Provost's iPhone X low light photography experiment over on the Studio Neat website.

Related Roundups: iPhone 7, iPhone 8, iOS 11, iPhone X

Discuss this article in our forums

Get A Safe & Fast Charge Up With The New RavPower Charger

You no longer have to plug a cable into your iPhone, thanks to the new RavPower charger, that was designed to be wireless, simple and faster than your traditional 3.5W charger. This charger can deliver an output of 7.5W to your iPhone 8, 8 Plus and X, while giving extra protection when charging your devices as well.

The RavPower charger comes with everything to keep your iPhone safe, while also charging it to 100%. For instance, this charger was built to protect your device from short circuiting, overheating or overcharging, since it was built to instantly stop once it’s at the max battery status, as well as flash green to let you know when it’s done charging.

It also comes with a non-slip rubberized coating to prevent your iPhone from falling off, and even an anti-skid underside that stops it from sliding or scooting from any surface it’s on; making it a great little charger to check in to, if you really want to protect your iPhone from any sort of falls or accidents when it’s powering up.

So if you happen to be interested in the new RavPower charger for your iPhone 8, 8 Plus or X, then you can always be sure to check it out over at Amazon.com where it’s currently going for $49.99.

Source: Amazon


Come comment on this article: Get A Safe & Fast Charge Up With The New RavPower Charger

New report suggests that the iPhone 8 won’t be Apple’s last LCD phone

Apple iPhone 8s

Whatever you think of the iPhone X, there's no debating that it's the most drastic evolution that Apple's smartphone line has ever seen. With it's all-screen design, OLED display, lack of home button and sensor array, it looks unlike any iPhone we've ever seen. But alongside the iPhone X, Apple launched a more traditional phone: the iPhone 8. Though it looks like a relic next to the X, it might not be the last LCD iPhone that Apple ever releases.

In a new report this week, Rosenblatt Securities analyst Jun Zhang said that as "steady" as iPhone X sales have been, the price is still a hurdle for many customers. Some customers simply aren't willing or able to pay $1,000 for a smartphone, which is why he believes that next year, Apple will release a new phone next year that retain the LCD display of the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, but feature a similar design to that of the iPhone X.

Continue reading...

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New report suggests that the iPhone 8 won’t be Apple’s last LCD phone originally appeared on BGR.com on Wed, 22 Nov 2017 at 18:11:52 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

How to record ultra slow motion 1080p/240 FPS video on your iPhone

All iPhones from iPhone 5s onward can record slow-motion video at 120 frames per second (FPS), but only the latest models powered by the A11 Bionic chip or newer, like iPhone 8 and iPhone X, boost the slo-mo frame rate to 240 FPS in full HD resolution (1,920-by-1,080 pixels).... Read the rest of this post here


"How to record ultra slow motion 1080p/240 FPS video on your iPhone" is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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