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More leaked Pixel 3 XL photos give us a better look at Google’s notch

Now that the release week of the Galaxy Note 9 has finally arrived, the Pixel 3 has supplanted Samsung’s flagship as the phone most likely to appear in an online leak. Just days after being spotted in the wild for the first time, the Pixel 3 XL has once again appeared out in public, and was once again photographed by a MobileSyrup reader.

Interestingly enough, the photos appear to have once again been taken on Canada’s public transportation system, possibly of the same early Pixel 3 XL user. But unlike last week’s shots, these were taken head on, giving us a much clearer look at the design of the phone. If there was any doubt that the phone would feature an iPhone X-like notch at the top of the display, those doubts have certainly been erased by this latest round of leaks.

The first of the two photos also shows us two front-facing cameras, though we’ll have to wait until Google unveils the phone later this fall to find out what dual front-facing cameras brings to the table. I have a feeling that portrait selfies with bokeh effect will be in the mix, and Google’s face unlock may get an upgrade too.

The back of the phone is mostly obscured in the second photo, but the single lens of the rear camera returns from last year’s Pixel 2 XL. The only noticeable difference is that the glass on the back curves downward at the edges into the material of what might be a case on the Pixel 3 XL (unless Google is including a fabric back).

Google’s creepy location-tracking policy just landed the company a brand-new lawsuit

Right on the heels of an Associated Press investigation confirming that Google creepily tracks user movements and locations even after they’ve tried to forbid that tracking, a San Diego man is now telling the tech giant “I’ll see you in court.”

Napoleon Patacsil has filed a complaint in federal court in San Francisco that seeks class action status on behalf of Android and iPhone users who turned off the “Location History” feature on their phones, which the complaint says Google ignored by then spying on their movements anyway.

“Google represented that a user ‘can turn off Location History at any time,” the complaint, which was filed on Friday, reads. “‘With Location History off, the places you go are no longer stored.’ This simply was not true.”

The crux of the suit is that Google is in violation of California’s Invasion of Privacy Act. A judge will presumably now set about the task of determining whether a class exists for the case and how to identify its members, which could include millions of Android and iPhone users in the U.S.

This comes on the heels of attorneys from the Electronic Privacy Information Center writing an angry letter to the Federal Trade Commission late last week, which you can read here. It blasts Google’s practices as being in violation of a 2011 settlement with the agency. “Google is not permitted to track users after they have made clear in their privacy settings that they do not want to be tracked,” the letter reads, before concluding “The FTC’s failure to enforce its Consent Orders places American consumers at risk. The Commission’s inactions have made the Internet less safe and less secure for users and consumers.”

The thing that set all this in motion is the AP investigation, which apparently forced Google to tweak the language on the help page explaining how its “Location History” setting works. Per the AP, “its help page now states: ‘This setting does not affect other location services on your device.’ It also acknowledges that ‘some location data may be saved as part of your activity on other services, like Search and Maps.’

Previously, the page stated: ‘with Location History off, the places you go are no longer stored.’

Bringing up the 2011 settlement with the FTC is relevant here, because Google had previously agreed it wouldn’t misrepresent anything related to “(1) the purposes for which it collects and uses covered information, and (2) the extent to which consumers may exercise control over the collection, use, or disclosure of covered information.”

Google provided a short statement in response to the AP reporting last week: “We have been updating the explanatory language about Location History to make it more consistent and clear across our platforms and help centers.” The company hasn’t, however, responded yet about the filing of the lawsuit.

Man sues over Google’s “Location History” fiasco, case could affect millions

If “Location History” was off, Google said it didn’t keep data—but that’s not true.

If your Pixel 2 XL has been lagging lately, you might get a free replacement

If you’ve been experienced consistent lag on your Pixel 2 XL, you might not be the only one. We learned that in recent weeks, when two prominent Android users, including Artem Russakovskii and Marquees Brownlee, detailed their experiences with the handset.

Google is aware of the issues and is investigating them. And if you experience the problem, you might qualify for a full device replacement.

There’s no official position from Google on these defective Pixels, and it’s likely the issue only affects a limited number of users. But Russakovskii’s phone was so slow it surprised the Googlers who came to his rescue:

https://twitter.com/ArtemR/status/1029145513864572928

However, after Russakovskii and Brownlee raised awareness about the Pixel 2 XL’s potential lag, it sure looks like Google is taking it very seriously.

Google has identified three possible causes for the slowdown, one of which would require hardware replacements, the news comes from an anonymous source who informed 9to5Google’s Stephen Hall about the matter:

https://twitter.com/hallstephenj/status/1030100601303179264

Google will likely offer fixes soon to anyone affected, including replacements if they’re warranted.

If you think your Pixel 2 XL is laggy compared to when you bought it, you should probably contact Google for more information — also check out the videos at this link to see what qualifies as lag on the Pixel 2 XL.

As a reminder, the Pixel 3 series launches in a couple of months so you might want to trade-in your Pixel 2 for a next-gen phone, regardless if it’s laggy or not if the opportunity presents itself.

If your Pixel 2 XL has been lagging lately, you might get a free replacement

If you’ve been experienced consistent lag on your Pixel 2 XL, you might not be the only one. We learned that in recent weeks, when two prominent Android users, including Artem Russakovskii and Marquees Brownlee, detailed their experiences with the handset.

Google is aware of the issues and is investigating them. And if you experience the problem, you might qualify for a full device replacement.

There’s no official position from Google on these defective Pixels, and it’s likely the issue only affects a limited number of users. But Russakovskii’s phone was so slow it surprised the Googlers who came to his rescue:

https://twitter.com/ArtemR/status/1029145513864572928

However, after Russakovskii and Brownlee raised awareness about the Pixel 2 XL’s potential lag, it sure looks like Google is taking it very seriously.

Google has identified three possible causes for the slowdown, one of which would require hardware replacements, the news comes from an anonymous source who informed 9to5Google’s Stephen Hall about the matter:

https://twitter.com/hallstephenj/status/1030100601303179264

Google will likely offer fixes soon to anyone affected, including replacements if they’re warranted.

If you think your Pixel 2 XL is laggy compared to when you bought it, you should probably contact Google for more information — also check out the videos at this link to see what qualifies as lag on the Pixel 2 XL.

As a reminder, the Pixel 3 series launches in a couple of months so you might want to trade-in your Pixel 2 for a next-gen phone, regardless if it’s laggy or not if the opportunity presents itself.