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Chinese consumer group wants Apple to answer for slowing down iPhones

iPhone Slowdown Scandal

The iPhone slowdown is Apple’s biggest scandal in years. In spite of acknowledging the issue, apologizing for throttling iPhones with old batteries, and offering cheaper battery replacements, Apple still has to face plenty of backlash from consumers and governments around the world.

A Chinese consumer group is the latest authority to demand answers from Apple on the matter.

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Chinese consumer group wants Apple to answer for slowing down iPhones originally appeared on BGR.com on Tue, 16 Jan 2018 at 06:50:34 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Chinese Consumer Group Demands Answers From Apple Over Older iPhone Slowdowns

Apple's iPhone slowdown controversy extended to China on Tuesday after a Chinese consumer group asked the tech giant for information about iOS updates that reduce the performance of older iPhones (via Reuters).

The Shanghai Consumer Council has written to Apple and requested an explanation for the slowdowns and information about what Apple planned to do to rectify the problem. The consumer group, which is a non-government organization approved by the Chinese authorities, demanded a response by Friday, according to state news agency Xinhua.


The council explained that its query came in response to consumer feedback that old iPhones became sluggish after upgrading the operating system to iOS 10.2.1. It said it had received 2,615 complaints about Apple products and services in 2017, compared to 964 complaints in 2015.

Last month Apple confirmed that it introduced power management features in the update to improve performance and prevent unexpected shutdowns as the battery in the devices starts to degrade. The company faces an increasing number of lawsuits that either accuse the company of intentionally slowing down older iPhones, or of failing to disclose power management changes it made starting in iOS 10.2.1.

For more information about the power management system that Apple implemented in the update, check out our frequently asked questions.

Tag: China

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Some international accounts alerted to Apple’s iCloud transfer in China

Enlarge (credit: Samuel Axon)

Apple began notifying Chinese iCloud customers of the forthcoming hand-off of its cloud service to the Chinese company Guizhou on the Cloud Big Data (GCBD), which will take over local operations starting February 28. However, TechCrunch reported that some non-Chinese iCloud accounts have been notified of this change. Some users with US-based billing addresses and connections to the US App Store received the notification email stating the physical location of their iCloud data will change come February.

According to Apple's help page on the issue, your iCloud's country or region setting dictates whether or not your account will be part of the migration.

The operation of iCloud services associated with Apple IDs that have China in their country or region setting will be subject to this transition. You will be notified of this transition via email and notifications on your devices. You don't need to take any further action and can keep using iCloud in China.

After February 28, 2018, you will need to agree to the terms and conditions of iCloud operated by GCBD to keep using iCloud in China.

Users should update their iCloud location settings if they don't reside in China anymore, to avoid being swept up in the data migration. TechCrunch's report also claims some accounts registered overseas (not in China) are part of the migration, but it's unclear if that means these accounts were simply notified of the migration, or if they will certainly be part of the impending migration. Ars has reached out to Apple for clarification.

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International User Accounts Swept Up in Chinese iCloud Data Migration

Apple's announcement on Wednesday that its iCloud services in mainland China will be handed over to a Chinese company has already run into controversy, after it emerged that accounts registered overseas are being swept up in the migration.

Apple said yesterday that customers based in China had been contacted and advised to examine new terms and conditions, which include a clause that both Apple and the Chinese firm will have access to all data stored on iCloud servers, which will be transferred from February 28. Customers living in mainland China who did not want to use iCloud operated by GCBD had been given the option to terminate their account.


However, according to some users who spoke to TechCrunch, in the data to be handled by local partner Guizhou-Cloud Big Data (GCBD), Apple is including iCloud accounts that were opened in the U.S., are paid for using U.S. dollars, and/or are connected to U.S.-based App Store accounts.


When asked for comment, Apple pointed to its terms and conditions site, which explains that it is migrating iCloud accounts based on the settings of the user's device, not where an iCloud account is registered or billed to.
The operation of iCloud services associated with Apple IDs that have China in their country or region setting will be subject to this transition. You will be notified of this transition via email and notifications on your devices. You don’t need to take any further action and can keep using iCloud in China.

After February 28, 2018, you will need to agree to the terms and conditions of iCloud operated by GCBD to keep using iCloud in China.
As it stands, this could result in thousands of users temporarily living in China to study or work having their data migrated to servers under the control of GCBD, which is owned by the Guizhou provincial government in southern China.

The situation is said to have left many users feeling trapped into the migration, but one user has discovered an apparent opt-out. This involves switching an iCloud account back to China before signing out of all devices. The user then switches their iPhone and iCloud settings to the U.S., and after signing back into iCloud, their account should no longer be part of the migration.

"What will Apple do when the Chinese authorities request a backdoor to access data that is encrypted?" Charlie Smith, founder of censorship monitoring site Great Fire, told TechCrunch. "Will they continue to adhere to local laws and regulations and submit to the request? Or are they leaving this decision squarely in the hands of GCBD, their local partner?"

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Tags: China, iCloud

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Apple to turn over iCloud data in mainland China to a state-owned local partner next month

Complying with Chinese law mandating that customer data collected on the China mainland be stored locally, Apple has now officially confirmed that it will be turning over Chinese customers’ iCloud data to a state-owned local partner on February 28.... Read the rest of this post here


"Apple to turn over iCloud data in mainland China to a state-owned local partner next month" is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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