Tagged: Apps & Software

6 paid iPhone apps on sale for free on August 17th

There’s time for one more roundup before you slip away into the weekend, so we’ve got six fresh paid iPhone and iPad apps for you that are all on sale for free right now. There are a few useful apps on today’s list as well as some fun games, so don’t miss out.

This post covers paid iPhone and iPad apps that have been made available for free for a limited time by their developers. BGR is not affiliated with any app developers. There is no way to tell how long they will be free. These sales could end an hour from now or a week from now — obviously, the only thing we can guarantee is that they were free at the time this post was written. If you click on a link and see a price listed next to an app instead of the word “get,” it is no longer free. The sale has ended. If you download the app anyway, you will be charged by Apple. Subscribe to our RSS feed to be notified as soon as these posts are published and you’ll avoid missing the sales we cover.

Grocery/Shopping List Pro

Normally $2.99.

The easiest and best way to manage your shopping lists on your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch. Preloaded with over 330 top used food items in this ultimate food list database. Or you can add your own custom grocery items so that you can create personalized lists quickly and accurately. All products are saved locally to your phone so there is no need for an internet connection.

There is also the ability to share your lists via text, email or messenger app with the touch of a button. Keep family members in the loop and share easily with everyone.

Beautifully designed and made for quick access. Perfect for grocery or shopping lists, ensures that you will never miss an item on your shopping list again.

Saves you:

* Time: a well-planned list updated in real time saves precious minutes and hours in a store.

* Money: when you know what to buy you’re safe from spontaneous purchases and waste.

* Zen – you will be happier without the frustration caused by double purchases or forgotten items

* Environment: paper shopping lists are made of trees. Our list is made of code which is environmentally friendly.

Bring your shopping list to the next level and make shopping a whole lot easier. Shopping

How much is your time worth? Save money, time and energy with the Shopping List Pro app.

Download Grocery/Shopping List Pro

Run In Crowd

Normally $0.99.

“Run In Crowd” is a indie game where you race alongside other players in a new world each day.

Tap to jump and double-jump. Longer you tap, higher your runner jumps. Avoid obstacles and try to run longer distance than other.

Features:
* Multiplayer – you race alongside other players
* Level generation – you run in a new world each day
* Simple and addictive gameplay with simple controls
* Achievements

Download Run In Crowd

Extreme Week Calendar

Normally $1.99.

Light version of the popular Extreme Agenda organizer app. It gives you a 7 day week view and inline day view to add great features not found in the default calendar.

Use it as a great week calendar, or as a trial to see the quality of our advanced Extreme Calendar and Extreme Agenda solutions. Once you are ready you can easily upgrade to the more advanced products from within the app.

Features Include:

Great Calendaring
• Powerful Week and Timeline Day with inline editing.
• Uses and expands on your native calendar data.
• Sync like you would with the default calendar(Google, iCloud, Exchange).
• Advanced repeating event options.
• Move/Copy Events
• Event Templates
• Email Events
• Show events on Facebook
• Military time, ISO week, and week start options.
• Uses time bars and icons to keep you informed at a glance
• Filter events based on iCal calendars.
• Almost 200 professional icons to mark your events

Power and Flexibility
• Universal Support
• TextExpander Support
• Portrait and Landscape Support.
• Retina Display Support.
• Background and color theme choices.
• Help System

• Easily upgraded to Extreme Calendar or Extreme Agenda Planner

Download Extreme Week Calendar

Drop Flop!

Normally $0.99.

Test your finger reflex skills in this screen tapping, ball dropping good time!

Game play is easy to learn, hard to put down
– Tap the screen to drop a ball
– Time your taps to catch each ball
– No time limit

Fast and smooth, perfect for all sorts of occasions, you can drop a flop at school, on the toilet, in your bed, at work, there’s no limit to where you can Drop Flop!

Download Drop Flop!

Featured of Wallpapers & Cool Backgrounds App

Normally $2.99.

The Featured Collection of more than 500k HD Wallpapers created by users for the year in Top Chart app, download for Free! Every day we aggregate Wallpapers and generate the 7 unique collections. Also we have created more than 350 categories for easy search, and the ones’ total amount is growing every day! Try to scroll to the end of the list 🙂 The troubles are stopping, when the Featured App open!

Download Featured of Wallpapers & Cool Backgrounds App

Whim – Dating, Not Texting

Normally $4.99.

Created by a Stanford grad and former OkCupid Labs employee, Whim is a free mobile dating app that eliminates endless messaging and sends users on real-life dates instead. We’ve made going from phone to date delightful, seamless, and magical. Whim is all about authenticity and meeting up in real life. Spending time with someone in person is the best and only way to see if there’s chemistry!

“Forget rummaging through in-depth profiles and messaging back and forth. If two people are interested in each other, they’re going on a date.” – The L.A. Times

“Whim skips the whole messaging shenanigans to get you on more dates more efficiently and effectively.” – Examiner

“For the uncoupled among us who’d rather gaze into some pretty eyes than a busted-up iPhone” – The Boston Globe

Whim sets up actual dates for you over the next seven nights. Tell the app when you’re free, browse profiles and say whom you’d like to meet. When two people say “yes” to each other, we plan a date for you right away – right down to the time and place. With Whim, you skip the endless messaging, planning, and waiting around — and instead go from phone to date in just a few taps!

Other exclusive Whim features include:

– Scheduling dates for you based on your availability
– Suggesting a specific bar or cafe to meet, conveniently located between the two of you
– 10-second profile videos
– Easy and intuitive interface
– Manually curated user base to ensure a high-quality community
– Post-date feedback

Here’s how Whim works:

1. Real Time
Sign up for a date tonight, or any other night this week. You choose when and where on a personalized, real-time calendar.

2. Real People
Validated profiles with details like workplace, interests, and education level. Profile videos help your personality shine through.

3. Real Life
Real dates scheduled for you at vetted local hotspots with people you’ve pre-approved and want to meet.

It’s currently free to download Whim and go on dates! Upgrade to Star Membership to take advantage of premium features.

Download Whim – Dating, Not Texting

Google’s location tracking could earn it yet another record fine from the EU

Google has been dealt two huge blows in Europe in recent years, where antitrust investigations have ruled the company abused is position in search as well as in the mobile market. The company received two record fines as a result, which added up to more than €6.74 billion ($7.66 billion). On top of that, a third investigation is in the works and could bring over additional fines.

To top things off, the European Union might decide to investigate Google’s location tracking practices in the near future, in light of the recent revelation that Google is tracking you even when you think it’s not able to. That’s because the entire EU is now governed by stronger laws when it comes to user data privacy, the GDPR rules, and lawmakers will surely want to enforce them to prevent breaches from tech giants.

A few days ago, an Associated Press investigation found that location tracking isn’t disabled when you think you’ve “paused” it because tracking continues in various Google apps, including Maps, Search, and others, regardless of your Location History setting. There’s one way to try to stop Google’s tracking, but that involves going into your Google account’s settings to make sure your web and other activity aren’t tracked. That solution isn’t exactly clear to the user, especially if one believes that simply pausing tracking is enough to prevent it.

Getting back to the EU, there’s no indication that a fourth investigation into Google targeting location and data collection practices might be in the works. But it’s unlikely that the lawmakers responsible for the GDPR regulations will let Google’s actions slide. The company faced various other European investigations concerning user data collection even before the GDPR rules went into effect.

Privacy advocates who talked to The Register argue that Google is misleading customers, which means Google is exposed to new fines under GDPR rules amounting 2% to 4% of Google’s turnover. Google reported $109.65 billion last year so a fine could amount to $4.5 billion under the assumption above.

Google, of course, disagrees with the claims surrounding location tracking. “We make sure Location History users know that when they disable the product, we continue to use location to improve the Google experience when they do things like perform a Google search or use Google for driving directions,” the company said in a statement.

The Register says that the extent of Google’s mobile data collection is only apparent if you configure a new Android phone, in which case you’d see Google’s “inadequate” user controls. The report also notes that Google isn’t only collecting location data when you think it’s paused, but also browsing history when you’re in “Incognito Mode.”

Google’s location tracking could earn it yet another record fine from the EU

Google has been dealt two huge blows in Europe in recent years, where antitrust investigations have ruled the company abused is position in search as well as in the mobile market. The company received two record fines as a result, which added up to more than €6.74 billion ($7.66 billion). On top of that, a third investigation is in the works and could bring over additional fines.

To top things off, the European Union might decide to investigate Google’s location tracking practices in the near future, in light of the recent revelation that Google is tracking you even when you think it’s not able to. That’s because the entire EU is now governed by stronger laws when it comes to user data privacy, the GDPR rules, and lawmakers will surely want to enforce them to prevent breaches from tech giants.

A few days ago, an Associated Press investigation found that location tracking isn’t disabled when you think you’ve “paused” it because tracking continues in various Google apps, including Maps, Search, and others, regardless of your Location History setting. There’s one way to try to stop Google’s tracking, but that involves going into your Google account’s settings to make sure your web and other activity aren’t tracked. That solution isn’t exactly clear to the user, especially if one believes that simply pausing tracking is enough to prevent it.

Getting back to the EU, there’s no indication that a fourth investigation into Google targeting location and data collection practices might be in the works. But it’s unlikely that the lawmakers responsible for the GDPR regulations will let Google’s actions slide. The company faced various other European investigations concerning user data collection even before the GDPR rules went into effect.

Privacy advocates who talked to The Register argue that Google is misleading customers, which means Google is exposed to new fines under GDPR rules amounting 2% to 4% of Google’s turnover. Google reported $109.65 billion last year so a fine could amount to $4.5 billion under the assumption above.

Google, of course, disagrees with the claims surrounding location tracking. “We make sure Location History users know that when they disable the product, we continue to use location to improve the Google experience when they do things like perform a Google search or use Google for driving directions,” the company said in a statement.

The Register says that the extent of Google’s mobile data collection is only apparent if you configure a new Android phone, in which case you’d see Google’s “inadequate” user controls. The report also notes that Google isn’t only collecting location data when you think it’s paused, but also browsing history when you’re in “Incognito Mode.”

Looks like Facebook overreacted with that Boston data firm it suspended last month

Facebook acted fast last month to suspend a Boston-based data analytics firm, Crimson Hexagon, from accessing Facebook and Instagram once reports surfaced suggesting the social network might have another Cambridge Analytica flap on its hands.

Turns out, everything’s fine now.

The data firm’s CFO wrote in a blog post today that access to its Facebook and Instagram accounts has been restored after a full review by Facebook. “After several weeks of constructive discussion and information exchange with Facebook, we are very pleased to report that Facebook and Instagram reinstated Crimson Hexagon and our entire customer base will now be able to once again access those data sources on our platform,” Dan Shore wrote.

“Several of Facebook’s questions focused on a small number of our government customers, which represent less than 5 percent of our business. Historically, we have vetted potential government customers similar to our other customers — with a goal of understanding their proposed use of our platform in order to make them successful. To our knowledge, no government customer has used the Crimson Hexagon platform for surveillance of any individual or group.”

His firm’s suspension last month was pretty high profile, with coverage in outlets like the Wall Street Journal noting the firm’s clients have included a Russian nonprofit connected to the Kremlin.

In a statement given to the WSJ at the time, Facebook vice president for product partnerships Ime Archibong said the social media giant allows outside parties to use its data to produce “anonymized insights for business purposes.” But Facebook forbids “use of its data for surveillance purposes.” The paper went on to note that Crimson Hexagon, which boasts a repository of more than 1 trillion public social media posts, “pulls only publicly available data from Facebook and Twitter. However, it appears at least once to have mistakenly received private data from Instagram, according to people familiar with the matter.”

The paper reported that that 2016 incident stemmed from Crimson Hexagon getting hold of some private Instagram posts in a batch of hundreds of public ones. Crimson Hexagon didn’t know who to call about it, because they didn’t have a direct line or contact yet at the social network.

Shore, meanwhile, said today that Crimson Hexagon has “enhanced” its vetting procedures for government customers. “We are hopeful that our extended dialogue with Facebook will lead to a strengthened and deepened Facebook partnership that will help our customers draw increased value from public online information on both of our platforms.”

Google just confirmed it still monitors your location data even with that setting turned off

The Internet lit up earlier this week with headlines all stemming from an Associated Press investigation that came to this creepy conclusion about Google: the search giant still tracks your location data even after you’ve essentially told it not to.

Now, Google has essentially confirmed that’s indeed what happens. The AP followed up that earlier story with a report today about revised language on a Google help page explaining how its “Location History” setting works. Google hasn’t changed the practice reported earlier this week, the AP makes clear, referring to its findings that several Google apps and websites store a user’s location even if they turn off Location History.

Per the AP, “its help page now states: ‘This setting does not affect other location services on your device.’ It also acknowledges that ‘some location data may be saved as part of your activity on other services, like Search and Maps.’ Previously, the page stated: ‘with Location History off, the places you go are no longer stored.’

So there it is — confirmation. Google provided a statement to the news outlet about today’s report saying only that “We have been updating the explanatory language about Location History to make it more consistent and clear across our platforms and help centers.”

The AP got interested in taking a look at this issue, which lead to its hot-button finding earlier this week, after getting tipped off about it it from K. Shankari, a graduate researcher at UC Berkeley. She’d noticed a prompt on her Android phone asking her to rate a trip to Kohl’s, even though her location history was turned off. Naturally, she wondered how Google Maps knew she’d made the trip.

She wrote about that experience here, concluding that “data collection for web browsing and social media is currently under intense scrutiny, but smartphone sensors can be the source of even more privacy sensitive data, collected completely without human interaction. Issues around consent, control and trust are currently fuzzy in this domain due to the blurring of boundaries between the phone operating system (OS) and proprietary services.”

Lots of people, of course, are potentially affected by this. A few billion, in fact. There are the two billion or so who use Android devices, plus the hundreds of millions of iPhone users running Google map and search apps.