ios 8 vs ios 9 2 In this guide we will teach you how to downgrade from iOS 9 to iOS 8.4.1 using older iOS devices like the iPhone 4s, 5, 5c, 5s, iPad 2 and 3.

Despite the fact that Apple has stopped signing the iOS 8.4.1 firmware, there is a way to go back to it. The iPhone 4s, 5, and 5c may not be able to provide enough power to handle or run iOS 9 smoothly, which could contribute to going back to iOS 8. Same goes for the iPad 2 or 3. Whatever your reason is for going back, we got you covered.

Recently, a tool called OdysseusOTA came out that lets anyone downgrade from iOS 9/9.0.2 to iOS 8.4.1. All you need is a jailbroken device running iOS 9.0.2. This tool works with the iPhone 4s, 5, 5c, 5s, iPad 2 and 3. This is possible since Apple is still signing an iOS 8.4.1 OTA blobs for those specific devices. If your device supports iOS 6, then you can use this tool to downgrade from iOS 9 to iOS 8.4.1.

Looking back some, the first version of OdysseusOTA let users downgrade from iOS 8 or iOS 7 to iOS 6.1.3. The cool part is that you don’t even need saved SHSH blobs to downgrade.

OdysseusOTA2 will let users downgrade from iOS 9.0.2 to iOS 8.4.1. As of this writing, a jailbreak is in the works for iOS 8.4.1 and should be available soon. So with that said, you cannot jailbreak iOS 8.4.1 since there is no tool as of now.

If you are on iOS 9.0.2 and want to go back to iOS 8.4.1, you will have to jailbreak your device using Pangu 9 tool first. After you are jailbroken on iOS 9.0.2, you can use OdysseusOTA2 to downgrade to iOS 8.4.1. Thanks to Tihmstar, the video below will guide you on how to downgrade from iOS 9.0.2 to iOS 8.4.1.

Something worth noting, the latest tool version is available to download from the YouTube link. The developer posts up updates for the tool on his YouTube video, so its best to grab it directly from there. Will you be downgrading? Sound off in the comments below.

Source info: Tihmstar’s YouTube channel

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