The Apple Pips

Inside All Apple Products

Author: arstechnica (Page 1 of 2009)

Windows 10 on ARM limits (briefly) confirmed: No virtualization, no OpenGL

Enlarge / The Snapdragon 835-powered HP Envy x2. (credit: HP)

As spotted by Paul Thurrott, Microsoft briefly published a document that enumerated the major differences between Windows 10 for ARM processors and Windows 10 for x86 chips. Though the document has now been removed, a cached copy is still available.

Many of the differences are predictable consequences of the different architecture. Windows 10 for ARM is a 64-bit ARM operating system. It can natively run both 32-bit and 64-bit ARM applications (though the SDK for the latter is currently, and temporarily, incomplete). As such, drivers for the operating system need to be 64-bit ARM drivers; existing 32- and 64-bit x86 drivers won't work.

This isn't a surprise; 64-bit x86 Windows can't use 32-bit drivers, either, even though 64-bit Windows can generally run 32-bit applications without even requiring any kind of emulation. This will mean that ARM Windows has limited hardware support relative to x86. It will also pose a problem for some games that use drivers for their copy protection.

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AT&T tries to prove Trump meddled in merger review because he hates CNN

Enlarge / AT&T will own a bunch of new media properties if it is allowed to buy Time Warner. (credit: Aurich Lawson)

AT&T and the Department of Justice are fighting in court over whether President Trump's hatred of CNN played a role in the DOJ's attempt to block AT&T's purchase of Time Warner Inc.

In a pre-trial court hearing on Friday, AT&T demanded "that the Justice Department hand over additional evidence to prove that President Trump did not wield political influence over the agency as its antitrust enforcers reviewed the company's bid to acquire Time Warner," The Washington Post reported.

AT&T wants the DOJ to provide logs of any conversations about the merger between the White House and Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The DOJ should also have to "disclose any conversations between Sessions and the agency's antitrust division," the Post wrote.

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In late-breaking photo leak, Galaxy S9 bares it all

WinFuture

German site WinFuture has given us a ton more Galaxy S9 pictures to admire before the phone's launch next week. The pictures show everything we've been expecting: a phone that looks a lot like the existing Galaxy S8 but with a revised camera and fingerprint setup on the back.

Besides offering the most complete look yet at Samsung's next flagship, these pictures shoot down an odd regression shown in the earliest Galaxy S9 leaks. The early pictures shared by VentureBeat showed a Galaxy S9 with thicker side bezels than the Galaxy S8, and now it seems those were not accurate. These pictures show a design that seems to have the same slim side bezels as the Galaxy S8, which, as usual, will curve into the phone body.

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The Boring Company gets a permit to dig up Washington DC parking lot

Enlarge / A view of the parking lot The Boring Company has permits to dig up (partially obscured by a tree, the parking lot on the left is for McDonald's). To the right is a mural that local cars editor Jonathan Gitlin hopes will not be destroyed. (credit: Google Streetview)

The city of Washington DC has approved a permit that will allow Elon Musk's Boring Company to dig up a parking lot just north of Capitol Hill and just east of downtown. The lot, at 53 New York Avenue NE, is on a busy street adjacent to a McDonald's, near the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

The Boring Company doesn't have permits to dig under any streets yet. But according to the LA Times, the city's Department of Transportation is working to find out what other kinds of permits the company would need to pass under city roads and public spaces.

The permit is an interesting step forward in a project that the Tesla and SpaceX CEO announced vaguely last July. At the time, Musk tweeted that he had "verbal government approval" to build a New York-DC Hyperloop tunnel, although it was unclear who had issued such approval. The Boring Company later commented that it was engaged in discussions with local, state, and federal officials to make the project happen. In October, the company received official approval from the state of Maryland to dig a 10.1-mile tunnel under the state-owned portion of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway using a utility permit (which is generally easier for a state to grant). Still, additional permits would be required for any construction beyond that limited scope.

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Flight-sim devs say hidden password-dump tool was used to fight pirates

Enlarge / Installing this airliner in a popular flight-sim seems to have exposed computers to potential malware. (credit: FlightSimLabs)

The usually staid world of professional-grade flight simulations was rocked by controversy over the weekend, with fans accusing mod developer FlightSimLabs (FSLabs) of distributing "malware" with an add-on package for Lockheed Martin's popular Prepar3d simulation. The developer insists the hidden package was intended as an anti-piracy tool but has removed what it now acknowledges was a "heavy-handed" response to the threat of people stealing its add-on.

The controversy started Sunday when Reddit user crankyrecursion noticed that FSLabs' Airbus A320-X add-on package was setting off his antivirus scanner. FSLabs had already recommended users turn off their antivirus protection when installing the add-on, so this wasn't an isolated issue.

The reason for the warning, as crankyrecursion found, was that the installer seemed to be extracting a "test.exe" file that matched a "Chrome Password Dump" tool that can be found online. As the name implies, that tool appears to extract passwords saved in the Chrome Web browser—not something you'd expect to find in a flight-sim add-on. The fact that the installer necessarily needs to run with enhanced permissions increased the security threat from the "Password Dump."

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Page 1 of 2009

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