A banned ozone-destroying chemical is being produced somewhere, but scientists can’t figure out where

cfc emissions

Scientists worked for years to prove that certain manmade chemicals were slowly eating away at the precious layer of ozone surrounding the planet and, one they did so, most developed countries agreed to stop using them. But worldwide environmental initiatives only work if countries keep their word, and scientists now suspect that a dangerous, ozone-eating chemical is still in production somewhere.

A new paper published in the journal Nature describes the ongoing problem. The chemical is tricholorofluoromethane, also called CFC-11, which should have been completely banned by 2010 thanks to the agreements reached in the Montreal Protocol. That international treaty went into effect in 1989, with countries promising to completely phase out the use of CFCs over following two decades. By 2010, scientists expected to begin seeing the positive impacts of the agreement, but what they saw instead has given them cause for concern.

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A banned ozone-destroying chemical is being produced somewhere, but scientists can’t figure out where originally appeared on BGR.com on Thu, 17 May 2018 at 10:09:34 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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