The Apple Pips

Inside All Apple Products

Author: arstechnica (Page 2 of 1481)

New surface is so slippery, shellfish can’t get a grip

Enlarge / A sticky situation. (credit: University of Washington)

When engineers look at mussels, they're typically looking in awe at how they anchor themselves to nearly every surface imaginable, all while under water. The fibers they use to attach themselves are incredibly strong, and the adhesive works wet or dry on all sorts of materials. For the most part, engineers are looking to create a substance with similar properties.

This week, however, brings an exception: engineers who want to try to keep mussels from sticking to everything. Zebra mussels, a species that has invaded the Great Lakes, is estimated to cost utilities hundreds of millions of dollars each year due to clogged pipes and intakes. Ships, buoys, and pretty much anything else we put in the water also ends up needing to have mussels cleared off.

The international team behind the new work has designed a material that mussels can't seem to get a grip on. It's not because the mussel's adhesive fail; instead, the mussel itself doesn't seem to know what it's touching when it's set down on the material.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

New surface is so slippery, shellfish can’t get a grip

Enlarge / A sticky situation. (credit: University of Washington)

When engineers look at mussels, they're typically looking in awe at how they anchor themselves to nearly every surface imaginable, all while under water. The fibers they use to attach themselves are incredibly strong, and the adhesive works wet or dry on all sorts of materials. For the most part, engineers are looking to create a substance with similar properties.

This week, however, brings an exception: engineers who want to try to keep mussels from sticking to everything. Zebra mussels, a species that has invaded the Great Lakes, is estimated to cost utilities hundreds of millions of dollars each year due to clogged pipes and intakes. Ships, buoys, and pretty much anything else we put in the water also ends up needing to have mussels cleared off.

The international team behind the new work has designed a material that mussels can't seem to get a grip on. It's not because the mussel's adhesive fail; instead, the mussel itself doesn't seem to know what it's touching when it's set down on the material.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Code chunk in Kronos malware used long before MalwareTech published it

Enlarge / Marcus Hutchins, security researcher for Kryptos Logic. In May, he registered a domain name that neutralized the WCry ransomware worm. In August, he was charged with developing malware called Kronos. (credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A chunk of code found in the Kronos bank-fraud malware originated more than six years before security researcher Marcus Hutchins is accused of developing the underlying code, a fellow security researcher said Friday.

The conclusion, reached in an analysis of Kronos published by security firm Malwarebytes, by no means proves or disproves federal prosecutors' allegations that Hutchins wrote Kronos code and played a role in the sale of the malware. It does, however, clarify speculation over a Tweet from January 2015, in which MalwareTech—the online handle Hutchins used—complained that a complex piece of code he had published a month earlier had been added to an unnamed malware sample without his permission.

Shortly after his arrest in Las Vegas two weeks ago, the Tweet resurfaced, and almost immediately it generated speculation that the malware Hutchins was referring to was Kronos. An analysis of Kronos soon showed that one portion used an instruction that was identical to one included in the code Hutchins published in January 2015.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Tor “can’t build free and open source tools” and stop racists from using them

(credit: Tor Project)

The Tor Project has reiterated its absolutist commitment to free speech, saying that even though Daily Stormer recently moved to a Tor onion service, the organization won’t do anything to stop the "hate-spewing website."

Various online services have begun to re-evaluate their willingness to do business with sites that publish obviously vile content in the wake of last weekend’s violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Earlier in the week, Google removed the Gab app on the Google Play store, and Squarespace said it would disable some of the offensive sites that it hosts as identified as hateful by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Most famously within the tech world, Daily Stormer itself was recently booted from CloudFlare’s CDN service after the company had initially said it would not do so.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Wisconsin lawmakers vote to pay Foxconn $3 billion to get new factory

Enlarge / House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, greets Terry Gou, president and chief executive officer of Foxconn, before President Donald Trump announces the first US assembly plant for electronics giant Foxconn, in the East Room of the White House on Wednesday, July 26, 2017. (credit: Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

The Wisconsin Assembly voted 59-30 on Thursday to approve a bill to give incentives worth $3 billion to Taiwan-based Foxconn so that the company would open its first US plant in the state.

Foxconn, best known for supplying parts of Apple's iPhones, will open the $10 billion liquid-crystal display plant in 2020, according to Reuters. The bill still has to be approved by a joint finance committee and the state Senate.

Both houses of Wisconsin's legislature are controlled by Republicans, and the deal is supported by Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, a Republican who negotiated the deal.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Page 2 of 1481

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén